Reconciliation Replay (July 10, 2014)

highlighting the best reconciliation words around

Best Tweets:

"Love loves for the sake of Love. Everything else is a hustle" - @ChrisHeuertz

"Dear young people, do not give up your dreams of a more just world!" - @Pontifex

Build/teach a strong foundation: "Making Sense of Race, Culture, Ethnicity and Class (Parts 1-4)" by Marque Jensen

"Here in the USA,  people often assume that the race of a person defines also their culture, ethnicity, and even class, this lie is the fruit of racism learned and internalized.   If instead, we see race as a social construct that only has the power assigned by society, we can begin to appreciate ethnic differences and culture uniqueness without allowing the lies of race to force us into making false assumptions....Read more"

De-center whiteness: "Made for Whiteness" by Austin Brown

"I used to think I was made for white people. I know that sounds a little crazy, but its true. When I discovered this thing called "racial reconciliation" I was attending a predominately white college where many people of color found themselves constantly teaching white folks about racial justice...that experience has been followed by a succession of employment, projects, workshops and speaking engagements that revolve around helping white people 'get it'....Read more"

LEAD by praying: "Leadership as Intercession Part 1" by Ruth Haley Barton

"One of the most consistent patterns of Moses’ life in leadership is the regularity with which he prayed for the people he was leading and sought God’s guidance for situations involving them. Rather than getting caught up in defending himself or arguing a point, he used his energy to carry the people into the presence of God, to cry out on their behalf and to listen to God for their next steps. Over and over again the pattern was very consistent: 'The people complained . . . and Moses cried out to the Lord.'...Read more"

REJECT white shame: "I Don't Feel Bad About Being White" by Jennifer Harvey

"I don’t feel bad about being white. I hate white supremacy. And I reject whiteness even though I know I continue to dwell in it, benefit from it and be shaped by it endlessly and every day.

But I can fight and challenge all of these things. Accepting them is not part of “being white.” And the commitment to challenging them, however imperfectly I continue to do so, is actually a sign of a self very much in tact (or at least as in tact as a self can be). It’s evidence that there’s an actual real human being in there—in here—amidst all the brokenness this system embroils me in. There’s a real human being in here attempting to grow towards wholeness by fighting that brokenness...Read more"

JUST READ THIS and ACT: "Killjoy Prophets, Asian Americans, and Racial Reconciliation" by Suey Park, Emily Rice and Mihee Kim-Kort

"Dialogues on race often include people of color who tell their stories of discrimination and marginalization to white people that in turn express their guilt about their position of privilege in society. The dialogues culminate in a fleeting moment of vulnerability and end after the confessions, with rarely any follow up actions taken...Read more"

LISTEN to black female voices: "17 New Books by Black Women to Add to Your Wishlist" by For Harriet

"Our #BlackGirlsLoveBooks picks are becoming so popular that I'm now asked to review books all the time. Due to time constraints, I can't do it, but I wanted to share some of the titles that have caught my eye this year. I'm defining "new" as released in the past 6 months...Read more"

LISTEN to female theological voices: "Women Doing Theology" by Beth Felker Jones

"Where are all the women writing all the good theology? We're not that hard to find. If something is on this board, it means one of the theologian-pinners thinks it's important (not necessarily that we agree with every word....)...Read more"

GET RESOURCES: "4 Black Church Resources That Can Help People Living With Depression" by Monica Coleman

"As black churches explore ways that they can be supportive of people living with mental illnesses, they can draw upon various resources within tradition resources that can be helpful to people living with depression. These historic practices can create a contemporary climate that is welcoming and supportive for faithful people living with depression...Read more"